Resources

SAFETY

Playing in the heat

Humidity is the amount of water vapor in the air. In forecasting, relative humidity describes the percentage of moisture in the air in comparison to how much there is when the air is saturated. The higher the reading, the greater the likelihood of precipitation, dew and fog. Relative humidity is normally highest at dawn, when the temperature is at its lowest point of the day.

High humidity makes people feel hotter than they would on a drier day. That’s because the perspiration that occurs to cool us down cannot evaporate as readily in moist, saturated air. To better describe how hot it feels in such circumstances, Canadian meteorologists developed the humidex parameter that combines temperature and humidity in order to reflect the perceived temperature.

 

Heat and Humidity Safety

It is important to stay safe during such extreme temperatures. Avoid working or exercising intensely if it is very hot or humid outside, and head for cooler conditions if your body becomes overheated. If working outdoors is an absolute necessity, drink plenty of liquids and take frequent rest breaks. Be sure to maintain salt levels in your body and avoid high-protein foods. Also ensure that pets are protected from the heat and have plenty of water to drink. Watch for signs of serious medical conditions, such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Relative humidity is the amount of moisture that the air contains compared to how much it could hold at a given temperature. A figure of 100 per cent relative humidity would mean that the air has become saturated. At this point mist, fog, dew and precipitation are likely.

 

Relative humidity is normally at its maximum when the temperature is at its lowest point of the day, usually at dawn. Even though the absolute humidity may remain the same throughout the day, the changing temperature causes the ratio to fluctuate. The humidex is a Canadian innovation, that was first used in 1965. It describes how hot, humid weather feels to the average person. The humidex combines the temperature and humidity into one number to reflect the perceived temperature. Because it takes into account the two most important factors that affect summer comfort, it can be a better measure of how stifling the air feels than either temperature or humidity alone. The humidex is widely used in Canada. However, extremely high readings are rare except in the southern regions of Ontario, Manitoba and Quebec. Generally, the humidex decreases as latitude increases. Of all Canadian cities, Windsor, Ontario has had the highest recorded humidex measurement: 52.1 on June 20, 1953. The hot, humid air masses which cause such uncomfortable weather usually originate in the Gulf of Mexico or the Caribbean.

 

Degree of comfort

REFERENCE LEGEND

 

20 – 29 No Discomfort

30 – 39 Some Discomfort

40 – 45 Great discomfort; avoid exertion

46 + Dangerous; possible heat stroke

An extremely high humidex reading can be defined as one that is over 40. If the reading is in the mid to high 30s, then certain types of outdoor exercise should be modified.

Concussion Safety and Rowan’s Law

The Paris Soccer Club acknowledges the enactment of Rowan’s Law in the province of Ontario and strives to educate coaches, referees and players of the symptoms of a concussion. The Act, Rowan’s Law (Concussion Safety), 2018, S.O. 2018 c. 1 – Bill 193 outlines requirements for sports organizations to adhere to.

The Province of Ontario provides concussion awareness resources for athletes, parents, coaches, trainers and referees that describe the symptoms of a concussion and what to do if you suspect one has occurred.

Please read the Paris Soccer Club’s policy statement on Rowan’s Law and concussion awareness for ages 10 and under, ages 11-14, 15 and up.

Avoiding Injuries

Proper Hydration

 

There are some simple guidelines which have been prepared by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) when it comes to running activities in a hot and/or humid environment. The goal in participating in hot weather is to avoid fluid loss from the body or dehydration. Water not only accounts for some 98% of our body composition, but functions to help deliver oxygen to working muscles, and keeps the body from overheating during strenuous activity. Hard working muscles generate heat which is dissipated through the act of sweating. Evaporation of sweat on the skin allows the body to get rid of this heat and cool it off. In looking at the objectives for advising officials and participates about this subject it seems that the following categories are areas requiring attention:

 

There are some simple guidelines which have been prepared by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) when it comes to running activities in a hot and/or humid environment. The goal in participating in hot weather is to avoid fluid loss from the body or dehydration. Water not only accounts for some 98% of our body composition, but functions to help deliver oxygen to working muscles, and keeps the body from overheating during strenuous activity. Hard working muscles generate heat which is dissipated through the act of sweating. Evaporation of sweat on the skin allows the body to get rid of this heat and cool it off.

 

 

In looking at the objectives for advising officials and participates about this subject it seems that the following categories are areas requiring attention:

  1. To educate athletes and event officials about the most common forms of environmental illness including predisposing conditions, warning signs, susceptibility and incidence reduction.
  2. To advise officials of their legal responsibilities and potential liability with regard to event safety and injury prevention
  3. To recommend that officials consult local weather archives and plan games at times likely to be of low environmental stress to minimize detrimental effects on athletes.
  4. To encourage officials to warn athletes about environmental stress on game \ practice day and the implications for heat and cold illness.
  5. To inform officials of preventive actions that may reduce debilitation and environmental illness.
  6. To describe the personnel, equipment, and supplies necessary to reduce and treat cases of collapse and environmental illness.

 

 

How can you tell if one of your soccer players is experiencing heat injury? Below is a list of the early warning signs to look for and again this is not an exhaustive list:

  1. Flushed face
  2. Hyperventilation or shortness of breath
  3. Headache
  4. Dizziness
  5. Tingling arms
  6. Goose bumps (hair on arms standing on end)
  7. Chilliness
  8. Poor coordination
  9. Confusion, agitation, uncooperativeness